Making Connections: Creativity & Business

The Fast Company headline-- How To Integrate Your Creative Double Life With Your Career-- jumped out at me this week.

First off, I'm pleased to have discovered a whole "My Creative Life" section, described as covering "the obsessions, passion projects, and avocations that inspire the most creative people in business." Sounds like a section I'll be visiting frequently.

As someone who straddles corporate life and artistry, I'm intrigued by how people juggle the different elements of their creative lives, or better yet-- find ways to blend and converge them. The woman featured in the piece, a GM engineer and artist/gallery owner, moved into the GM Venture group, where her she applies the entrepreneurial skills she gained as a gallery manager. She also sees a connection between art and technology:  "In tech it’s about creating products that can change the world. In art it’s painting a picture of how you would like the world to change. But it’s the same thing."

As a consultant, one of the things I really value is the variety of perspectives, clients and technologies that I'm exposed to. Not only does it keep me on my toes, learning and challenged, but I often find that I'm drawing connections and comparisons across seemingly unrelated areas-- and not just from clients and communications, but across music, art, tech and stories. My current pet project about communications lessons from the world of music embodies that kind of intersection, enabling me to explore new territory by blending a number of my interests.

This reminds me of yet another connection I've made-- in some of my artwork, comparing nature and technology.

Tech and nature in my artwork: painting that includes pine needles and computer resistors; juxtaposed gear and pine cone; acorns and rusted washers in a mixed media piece.

Tech and nature in my artwork: painting that includes pine needles and computer resistors; juxtaposed gear and pine cone; acorns and rusted washers in a mixed media piece.

The technical components echo the natural shapes, and all the pieces have eroded and been discarded, from worn-out rusted parts to fallen plant debris.